Book of Mormon Notes– How deep can you dig?

2008, October 31

www.snopes.com–Always Right or Sometimes Wrong?

Dear Snopes,

I’ve heard a rumor that your website is not truthful, can you help?

About two years ago (three at the most), after being somewhat disgusted when people often referred to snopes.com as an infallible authority source, especially during debates, I decided to check.

So, off to… a page about Mormons. I checked the “birdie” story, and there was inaccurate information about Mormons/ LDS. And the attitude wasn’t very nice, either. Hmmm… Hey, snopes.com is just people, too–who says they’re infallible or *the* authority? Unfortunately, many do.

Well, here’s what you will find RIGHT NOW: http://www.snopes.com/glurge/birdies.asp

The original was very different. Not only was the second story missing, but comments from snopes.com seemed to be leading to “this story is false and pretty laughable”. (Man, sorry snopes.com, but I don’t have the original site to double check!)

On that webpage, it says that the last update was on 11 June 2003. Not true.

(Was that a misprint? “Forgot to update it when we updated the rest of the site”? Or an intentional lie?)

To confirm this, I checked the history of the link/ site on the internet. Well, what do you know, I couldn’t find much at all from snopes.com from the major internet cache places! I’m not the best researcher, but… all empty. Hardly any records at all, even for http://www.snopes.com. Hmmm… (How did that happen, and why?)

Well, no need to look far to find proof it was changed. Just look at the story itself at that link:
“It was penned in 1994 by Lloyd Glenn, a Mormon then living in Mission Viejo, California, about the accident that befell his son Brian on 22 July 1993.”

Dear snopes.com, how can you put something up on your webpage that happened “in the future”?

I smell a rat.

Here: http://snopes.com/glurge/ it says that this story rating is “unverifiable veracity”. Did someone forget to change that, too–or are they referring to “it’s true the story was penned and believed by the family, but we can’t verify that the events actually happened”. Nope. Check their rating page (http://www.snopes.com/info/ratings.asp) for more detailed ratings, and once more, you will see proof that the page was recently updated without record.

And, where is the source for the “real story” that got posted up? Somehow, that got left off, too. See, only sources prior to 1993 exist on the webpage.

I have to applaud snopes.com for something, though–at least the current story is much better in attitude and information about Mormons/ LDS.

So, I hope this reminds you that snopes.com is run by humans who aren’t completely objective or infallible, either–just like none of us. No more “infallible authority” status, please!

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5 Comments »

  1. So, I hope this reminds you that snopes.com is run by humans who aren’t completely objective or infallible, either–just like none of us. No more “infallible authority” status, please!

    Yeah, I agree.

    Comment by jesurgislac — 2008, November 27 @ 3:43 pm

  2. I found several instances where Snopes claimed that it was a hoax, yet it was on the news, like Pelosi and her military airplane request.
    Also on petitions on line. If you send a petition through a reliable source like Alipac, they will print it out and deliver the prints to the senators or to whom it is addressed, just to show them how much interest there is. Yet Snopes just called it a hoax.

    Comment by Connie — 2008, December 7 @ 10:05 pm

  3. Hi Jesurgislac and Connie,

    After writing this post, I’ve searched and found that I’m far from the only one finding out more about snopes.com and finally posting to let everyone know, so we agree with even more people.

    Comment by grego — 2008, December 8 @ 8:09 am

  4. Yes Grego, but too many people will not comprehend that Snopes can be wrong.

    Connie

    Comment by Connie — 2008, December 8 @ 7:31 pm

  5. I’m glad someone posted about this story. I remember clearly. I had this article taped to my dresser mirror, as a boy. It was published in a florida newspaper no later than the late 70’s. I also remember the boy, in the story, saying that he went to a place, where there were birdies of every color.

    Comment by Anonymous — 2017, January 1 @ 1:31 pm


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